What is title attribute in wordpress

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HTML5 Accessibility Tricks: Use and Abuse of Title Attribution

Steve Faulker | 23 January 2012 | Developing

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For the past 7 years, others and I have been dwelling on the problems with the title attribute when it comes to accessibility and usability. The conclusion is that it is not well compatible with browsers and, as a consequence, its usefulness is seriously compromised. All browser vendors are aware of the issues with keyboard and touch interfaces, yet they have done nothing or made no commitment to improvements in the 19 years since it was originally specified in HTML .

The W3C HTML5 recommendation indicates the use of the title attribute:

Caveat ! Relying on the title attribute is currently discouraged, as many user agents do not expose the attribute in an accessible way as required by this specification (for example, it requires a pointing device such as a mouse for a tooltip to appear, which excludes users). keyboard-only users and -only users, such as anyone with a modern phone or tablet).

Examples of use and abuse of HTML title attributes

In the linked document title attribute usage examples, I provided some data for title attribute usage on a variety of popular sites. The examples illustrate that the title attribute is widely misused.

When to use the title attribute: Simplified

  1. Do not use the title attribute, in any element , for any text that you want all users to have access to.
  2. Only use it to label a form control when the same text is provided as visible text.
  3. Do not use it in a link to provide information that may be important to any user .
  4. When in doubt, read: Using the HTML title attribute

Other conferences:

  • Reasons not to allow the title attribute to be used as a substitute for the alt attribute in HTML5
  • Reason for not promoting the use of the title attribute for footnotes in HTML5
  • Reasons not to promote the title attribute as a subtitle container in HTML5
  • the definition of the attribution of the title does not coincide with reality

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Categories : Development

12c1f1f330e3f2e393d0a7e15ff18eb4 12c1f1f330e3f2e393d0a7e15ff18eb4

About Steve Faulkner Steve is the Director of Accessibility at TPGi. He joined TPGi in 2006 and was previously a senior web accessibility consultant at vision australia . Steve is a member of several groups, including the W3C Web Platforms Working Group and the W3C ARIA Working Group. He is editor of several W3C specifications including ARIA in HTML and HTML Accessibility API Mappings 1.0. It also develops and maintains HTML5 accessibility and JAWS bug tracking/standards support.

comments

d740e3ef86c484bcfcc8ca3f64b0209c d740e3ef86c484bcfcc8ca3f64b0209cAlice Wonder says:

January 23, 2012 @ 7:04am

One of the ways I am currently using the title attribute is to make up for a deficiency in html user agent implementation of the time element. For example (use square brackets instead of angle brackets):

[p]As of [time datetime=”2012-01-23″]today[/time] I still have not heard back.[/p]

I have my software go through and change it to

[p]As of [time datetime=”2012-01-23″ title=”January 23, 2012″]today[/time] I still have not heard back.[/p]. I then use CSS to add a light dotted underline to any time element that has a title attribute, similar effect to the way abbr is often rendered. That way someone reading the content can get context to what today is, something that browsers should support but do not.

I know that the date will not be available to someone without a mouse, it’s tempting to also set tabindex and then use JS onfocus to show the tooltip effect, but that may actually be more annoying then beneficial, I don’t know.

I could just put the date in instead of “today” which may be the result of what some screen readers do anyway, and in the example above that probably would be better, but in some cases it really doesn’t read as well to specify the full date in the paragraph itself. I thought using the title attribute w/ css to underline was a clever way to provide context for users who wanted it, context that should be made available by browsers when that tag is used but currently isn’t.

I’ll have to think about it some more. I really like the ability to add a timestamp via the time element and wish browsers implemented a way to let users know the context of the time stamp when it is provided. I don’t understand why it would even be part of the spec if it isn’t going to enrich the user experience, which is what I’m trying to do by using the title tag.

One thing I did do after reading about problems with redundant title tags is I changed my code to only put the title in when the date is not clear from the text itself. IE if I have [time datetime=”2012-01-23″]January 23, 2012[/time] then I don’t have it add a title tag because it is redundant and doesn’t add to the user experience for anyone.

f7bba1e31e72657d9e8a130f8187a097 f7bba1e31e72657d9e8a130f8187a097 Luke McGrath says:

January 23, 2012 at 9:48 am

It’s a perennial issue for anyone in touch with accessibility and must be the one thing I hear advocates scream about more than anything else. Personally I hate title attributes in any form, I hate the little yellow box that unhelpfully pops up to say something inane. It’s an element left over from the early iterations of the web and doesn’t have a role an a modern website.

It’s also bad SEO to be dropping titles everywhere, they don’t do anything. Half the time you see titles covering empty alt attributes to boot.

What do you guys think about using titles when an image (with an alt text of course) is a link? It’s probably the one area I can cope with titles but I still can’t bear the sight of tool tip boxes – who decided they were going to be that drab post-it yellow colour?

12c1f1f330e3f2e393d0a7e15ff18eb4 12c1f1f330e3f2e393d0a7e15ff18eb4 Steve Faulkner says:

January 24, 2012 at 5:42 am

Hi Luke,

What do you guys think about using titles when an image (with an alt text of course) is a link? It’s probably the one area I can cope with titles but I still can’t bear the sight of tool tip boxes – who decided they were going to be that drab post-it yellow colour?

Depends on what the title content is, if it is information that you would like all users to be able to access don’t use them. I wrote a post about providing captions for images using the new HTML5 figure and figcaption elements which may be helpful. One the examples provided is for captions that appear on hover/focus. The appearance of tooltips is reliant upon the OS, which is why they look like they do.

12c1f1f330e3f2e393d0a7e15ff18eb4 12c1f1f330e3f2e393d0a7e15ff18eb4 Steve Faulkner says:

January 24, 2012 at 5:46 am

Hi Alice, sounds like you are trying to do the right thing to avoid redundancy. I don’t see a problem with use of the title attribute if the information required to understand the content is available in text for all to access.

f7bba1e31e72657d9e8a130f8187a097 f7bba1e31e72657d9e8a130f8187a097 Luke McGrath says:

January 24, 2012 at 9:15 am

Thanks Steve,

if it is information that you would like all users to be able to access don’t use them

That about sums it up for me. I want all users to get all information. The captions option looks a good one – I’ll play around with that where I can. Someone should have a word with the OS – aesthetically, it’s like having tiny post-its stuck to your screen then peeled off again.

fc7940731323a945e3a165645a1fd4bf fc7940731323a945e3a165645a1fd4bf Sailesh Panchang says:

February 6, 2012 at 4:47 pm

Steve, When you say, ” use it to label a form control when the same text is provided as visible text”, I suppose you mean like a form in a data table where both the row and column header need to be associated with the field, right? Else explicit label association is the best way for visible text placed as next to / above the field to serve as labels, no? And when fields do not have visible label text because it is pretty obvious in the context like a single search field next to a search button, a title attribute on the INPUT is handy for benefit of non-visual users. This is widely supported by AT unlike the aria-label which essentially serves the same purpose.

The other issue is Firefox does not expose the alt when moused over on an image but it exposes the title. An example of incorrect rendering of the title and a disregard of the alt. Sailesh

12c1f1f330e3f2e393d0a7e15ff18eb4 12c1f1f330e3f2e393d0a7e15ff18eb4 Steve Faulkner says:

February 7, 2012 at 5:17 am

Hi sailesh, there are 2 main scenarios where I think it is appropriate:

A textbox with a button to the right which visually identifies the text boxes purpose. In data tables that contain inputs and the table header cells provide the visible labels

The other issue is Firefox does not expose the alt when moused over on an image but it exposes the title. An example of incorrect rendering of the title and a disregard of the alt.

unsure what you mean here?

51e79dc2894925581a7aaf1221a7a0e0 51e79dc2894925581a7aaf1221a7a0e0 Kevin says:

April 2, 2012 at 1:54 pm

My “Google fu” has failed. 😉 I’m trying to find a good search string that will describe what I’m looking for, and in frustration, I’m giving up and asking: I have a table and at the intersections of some rows and columns, I have a bullet — well, actually, a Unicode character that actually pays attention to the font-size style, in contrast with the actual bullet entity. If beaten into submission, I suppose I could substitute each bullet with an img, but I’d rather not. My question: How can I provide alternate text for what is, in effect, text, not an img. (I *want* to use alt=”” on a non-img span but I also want to stay with HTML5 compliance.)

12c1f1f330e3f2e393d0a7e15ff18eb4 12c1f1f330e3f2e393d0a7e15ff18eb4 Steve Faulkner says:

April 8, 2012 at 2:38 pm

Hi Kevin, can you provide a link to an example?

Cómo agregar un atributo de título en los menús de navegación de WordPress

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Recientemente, uno de nuestros lectores preguntó si hay alguna forma de agregar un atributo de título en los menús de WordPress . El atributo de título le permite proporcionar información adicional sobre un enlace. A menudo aparece como texto de información sobre herramientas cuando el mouse se mueve sobre el enlace. En este artículo, le mostraremos cómo agregar un atributo de título en los menús de navegación de WordPress.

How to Add Title Attributes in WordPress Menus How to Add Title Attributes in WordPress Menus

¿Por qué usar el atributo de título en los menús?

Title attribute is an HTML attribute that can be added to any element, but it is most commonly used with links and images.

It allows you to provide additional information about the link or the image. See our guide on the difference between what’s the difference between image alt text vs title.

Title attribute displayed as a tooltip for an image Title attribute displayed as a tooltip for an image

Typically web browsers display the title attribute on mouseover. This allows users to see where this link will take them before they click on it.

Screen readers may also read title attribute, but many screen readers will ignore it and will only read the anchor text.

Some SEO experts believe that it is not useful while others claim it is useful for SEO as it allows you to provide more context.

WordPress removed title attribute from insert link popup in version 4.2. However, you can easily add the title and rel=nofollow options in insert link popup.

Having said that, let’s take a look at how to add title attribute in WordPress navigation menus.

Video Tutorial

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If you don’t like the video or need more instructions, then continue reading.

Adding Title Attribute in WordPress Navigation Menu Items

First you need to visit Appearance » Menus page and click on the ‘Screen Options‘ tab in the top right corner of the screen.

Enable Title Assignment for WordPress Navigation Menus Enable title attribute for navigation menus in WordPress

This will bring down a menu where you need to click on the check box next to Title Attribute option.

Después de eso, simplemente desplácese hacia abajo y haga clic en cualquier elemento del menú en su menú existente para expandirlo. Ahora verá el campo de atributo de título.

Add title attribute to menu item Add title attribute to menu item

You can now add the text you want to use as a title and then repeat it for all menu items in your navigation menu.

Don’t forget to click the Save menu button to store your changes.

You can now visit your website and hover over a link in the navigation menu. You will see the title attribute displayed as a tooltip.

Title displayed in the tooltip Title displayed in tooltip

You can take title attributes even further with jQuery by adding fancy tooltips on the mouseover effect.

We hope this article helped you learn how to add a title attribute to WordPress navigation menus. You can also see our list of the 15 best tutorials for mastering WordPress navigation menus.

If you’re invited to this article, subscribe to a new YouTube channel for WordPress video tutorials. Also puede encontrarnos on Twitter and Facebook .

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HTML title attribute

❮ Global Attributes Previous HTML Next ❯

Example

Use the assigned title in an HTML document:

<p> <abbr title=”World Health Organization”>WHO </abbr> was founded in 1948. </p> <p title=”Free Web Tutorials”>W3Schools.com </p>

Inténtalo tú mismo” Definition and use

The title attribute specifies extra information about an element.

The information is usually displayed as a tooltip text when the mouse moves over the element.

The title attribute can be used on any HTML element (it will validate on any HTML element. It’s not necessarily useful, though).

Browser compatibility

Attribute
Titre Oui Oui Oui Oui Oui

Syntax

< element title =” text “>

Award values

Assess La description
text Tooltip text for an item

related pages

Tutoriel HTML : Attributs HTML

HTML DOM reference: HTML DOM title owner

CSS tutorial: information on CSS options

❮ Global Attributes Previous HTML Next ❯

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Video What is title attribute in wordpress

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